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Kiowa County Signal - Kiowa County, KS
  • PAM'S PANORAMA: 'February is heart month'

  • When February rolls around it is time to be thinking of hearts.  Not only the Valentine kind but the one that keep us all living and breathing.


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  • When February rolls around it is time to be thinking of hearts.  Not only the Valentine kind but the one that keep us all living and breathing.
    Chances are you, or someone you know have had some sort of heart condition.  Many recover completely and live normal lives. 
    How much do you know about heart disease?
    When a heart attack happens it stops the flow of blood to the heart. Severe coronary artery spasms can cause heart attacks.  This is also called a coronary occlusion.
    Blood clots cause coronary thrombosis, a form of occlusion.  The medical term for a heart attack is a myocardial infarction.
    Cardiac arrest, however, is a malfunction of the electrical system in the heart.  If the heart completely stops working properly, it can lead to death.
    According to the American Heart Association, someone has a heart attack about every 34 seconds.  Don’t let it be you!!!
    You may be experiencing cardiovascular problems if you notice that ordinary physical activity causes you to experience the following symptoms:
    Undue fatigue
    Palpitations --- the sensation that your heart is skipping a beat or beating too rapidly
    Dyspnea --- difficult or labored breathing
    Anginal pain --- chest discomfort from increased activity
    Stable angina (or chronic stable angina) refers to "predictable" chest discomfort such as that associated with physical exertion or mental or emotional stress. Rest and/or nitroglycerin usually relieve stable angina.
    Unstable angina refers to unexpected chest pain and usually occurs at rest. It is typically more severe and prolonged and is due to a reduced blood flow to the heart caused by the narrowing of the coronary arteries in atherosclerosis. Unstable angina is an acute coronary syndrome and should be treated as an emergency.
    Learn more about your heart at www.heart.org.
    pmuntz@ksu.edu
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