Once the new Kiowa County Memorial Hospital opens its doors for business next month many advantages of the new facility over the former will be obvious, not all of which will be in the features of the building itself.


   Expanded services will also allow KCMH to offer county residents a better health care experience, not the least of which will be a full-time physical therapist.


 

   Once the new Kiowa County Memorial Hospital opens its doors for business next month many advantages of the new facility over the former will be obvious, not all of which will be in the features of the building itself.

   Expanded services will also allow KCMH to offer county residents a better health care experience, not the least of which will be a full-time physical therapist.

   Tanya Yoder, formerly Tanya Snyder, is no stranger to the Kiowa County area and decided to move back here from Hutchinson when the need for a physical therapist in Greensburg was recently advertised.

   Yoder spent her childhood locally, living just outside Belvidere until moving with her family to a home south of Mullinville when she was four.  She attended school there until the end of her freshman year in high school, 1990, the last year Mullinville’s high school operated.  She then graduated from Coldwater High when her family moved near Wilmore.

   It was while she was in high school—she thinks it was her junior year—that Yoder came to the conclusion she wanted to work in the physical therapy field.  Before then from the time she was old enough to remember she simply knew she “wanted to work with either animals or people to help them.”  In the end, people won out.

   After two years at Barton Community College in Great Bend to get her prerequisites out of the way, Yoder got her bachelor’s at Wichita State in ’97.  Two years later she graduated from WSU’s masters program in physical therapy.  From there she went to Hutchinson where she worked in physical therapy until the end of last year, having accepted the position at KCMH.

   Though she formally began working in Greensburg January 4 she won’t be able to see patients on any kind of regular basis until moving into her roomier quarters in the new facility.  As of now she has basically a corner in one of the modular buildings that has served as KCMH’s temporary site during construction of the new hospital across the highway.

   “When I first came I was told we’d move into the new building February 1,” Snyder said.  “But now it’s going to be a little later, so I spend my days setting policy and guidelines, all the paperwork that will need to be in place to get going.”

   As for why she left her job in Hutchinson, where she was one of 15 physical therapists on staff, Yoder said it was mainly to move back to where her family is.  Her mom still lives near Wilmore, as do three brothers and a sister in Coldwater.  Another decisive factor was the complementary daycare the hospital here offers to employees.  Yoder has two young boys who make use of the facility, two-year-old Ethan and six-month-old Colt.  Husband Dean, meanwhile, continues commuting to his job in Hutchinson, where he works for a tree service company. 

   The couple is in the process of building a home south of Coldwater, on land made available to them by Tanya’s mom.

   While KCMH offered physical therapy services before the tornado, it was on a limited basis.  A certified therapist was in town only one or two days a week, whereas Yoder will be full time at the Greensburg facility.

   Addition of a physical therapist is significant simply because of the broad range of services such a profession offers.

   “I’ll deal with a variety of patients needs,” Yoder said.  “A lot of it is pain dysfunction, which could be lower back, neck, knee pain and so forth.  A physical therapist also works with wound care, like caring for the tissue in a recovery from a burn or diabetic ulcer.”  It is, for instance, a physical therapist that typically removes dead tissue from the affected area of a burn victim.

   No one, however, can simply walk into a physical therapist’s office and ask for treatment.  They must come bearing a physician’s referral.

   Regardless of how soon she’s able to move to her new digs across the street, Yoder is convinced she made the right move in coming back to the area.

   “I really wanted my kids to grow up with their cousins,” she said.  “And I’m excited to be able to offer my services in such a great, new facility.”  Sounds like a win-win situation for Yoder and the community.