There are few reports of the crime in Kiowa Coun- ty, but for those who are suffering, help is available.

“We don’t get many calls for it in Greensburg or the county,” said Greensburg Police Chief Paul Alvarez. “But just because it isn’t be- ing reported, doesn’t mean it isn’t happening, and I’m not saying it is. Its just not being reported.”

If someone in the area is a victim of domestic vio- lence “we can get you help,” Alvarez said.

When law enforcement get reports of domestic vi- olence, they give victims the number to the Family Crisis Center Hotline ñ 1- 866-792-1885. The hotline is open 24/7 and there are four bilingual advocates available to help non-Eng- lish speakers, said Becky Davis, domestic and sexu- al violence program direc- tor for the Family Crisis Center.

“The main thing we tell them is it wasn’t their fault and we believe them,” Davis said.

All services are free and confidential. Their servic- es include advocacy, court accompaniment, help with protection from abuse or- ders, safe shelters and oth- er services. If a person needs to talk with an ad- vocate face-to-face, the center can arrange for a safe meeting place at any time.

The Family Crisis Center There are few reports of the crime in Kiowa Coun- ty, but for those who are suffering, help is available.

“We don’t get many calls for it in Greensburg or the county,” said Greensburg Police Chief Paul Alvarez. “But just because it isn’t be- ing reported, doesn’t mean it isn’t happening, and I’m not saying it is. Its just not being reported.”

If someone in the area is a victim of domestic vio- lence “we can get you help,” Alvarez said.

When law enforcement get reports of domestic vi- olence, they give victims the number to the Family Crisis Center Hotline ñ 1- 866-792-1885. The hotline is open 24/7 and there are four bilingual advocates available to help non-Eng- lish speakers, said Becky Davis, domestic and sexu- al violence program direc- tor for the Family Crisis Center.

“The main thing we tell them is it wasn’t their fault and we believe them,” Davis said.

All services are free and confidential. Their servic- es include advocacy, court accompaniment, help with protection from abuse or- ders, safe shelters and oth- er services. If a person needs to talk with an ad- vocate face-to-face, the center can arrange for a safe meeting place at any time.

The Family Crisis Center There are few reports of the crime in Kiowa Coun- ty, but for those who are suffering, help is available.

“We don’t get many calls for it in Greensburg or the county,” said Greensburg Police Chief Paul Alvarez. “But just because it isn’t be- ing reported, doesn’t mean it isn’t happening, and I’m not saying it is. Its just not being reported.”

If someone in the area is a victim of domestic vio- lence “we can get you help,” Alvarez said.

When law enforcement get reports of domestic vi- olence, they give victims the number to the Family Crisis Center Hotline ñ 1- 866-792-1885. The hotline is open 24/7 and there are four bilingual advocates available to help non-Eng- lish speakers, said Becky Davis, domestic and sexu- al violence program direc- tor for the Family Crisis Center.

“The main thing we tell them is it wasn’t their fault and we believe them,” Davis said.

All services are free and confidential. Their servic- es include advocacy, court accompaniment, help with protection from abuse or- ders, safe shelters and oth- er services. If a person needs to talk with an ad- vocate face-to-face, the center can arrange for a safe meeting place at any time.

The Family Crisis Center serves a 10-county area and is based in Great Bend. It has offices in Pratt and Larned. In 2015, the center took over 3,000 crisis calls, assisted 225 domestic violence victims (adults and children), helped 52 sexual assaults and sheltered 81 in the 10 county area, Davis said.

“Abuse ranges from near death to verbal and emotional abuse,” Davis said. “Domestic violence covers a wide range of abuse. Typically, abusers only use the amount of violence necessary to maintain power and control over the victim. Sometimes there’s not a lot of physical abuse but it’s still enough to control the victim. Their goal is to maintain power and control over a partner. They use any means necessary to maintain power and control.”

The center sees a small increase in domestic violence reports every year, Davis said. The economic decline in the state exacerbates the problem, Davis said.

“Every time there’s stress in the family it escalates the violence,” Davis said. “It doesn’t cause violence but it makes the violence worse.”

Drug and alcohol abuse do not cause domestic violence, but it is often present, Davis said.

The most dangerous time for a victim is when she is planning to leave the abuser or just after she has left and there are abusers who will stalk a victim and try to monitor her every move, Davis said.

One of the first things the advocates with the Family Crisis Center do when talking to survivors of domestic violence is ask if they have friends or family they can stay with, Davis said.

“We ask what safe people they have in their lives,” Davis said. “We try that avenue first.”

If necessary, the Family Crisis Center can provide a shelter for women and their children.

“Even if we’re full, we made a room or find another shelter,” Davis said. “We find accommodations for people to be safe.”

Alvarez said of the Family Crisis Center, “They give a lot of help.”

There is also a National Domestic Violence hotline at 1-800-799-7233 that is available 24/7 and 365 days a year with bilingual advocates on hand.

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