County Commissioner Earl Liggett took time at the July 23 commission meeting to voice strong objections to the work habits and overall behavior of the temporary work force being paid out of U.S. Department of Labor funds to carry out various tasks in the city of Greensburg and county departments.


County Commissioner Earl Liggett took time at the July 23 commission meeting to voice strong objections to the work habits and overall behavior of the temporary work force being paid out of U.S. Department of Labor funds to carry out various tasks in the city of Greensburg and county departments.
Liggett specifically targeted several young adults with whom he’d come into contact around or on July 18-19 at the County’s south landfill, saying one “smarted off at me when I asked why he couldn’t get out of his air conditioned office and look at my load.”
He reported another being “drunk at 9:30 in the morning the next day” while yet another “had his girlfriend out there the next day.”
Liggett also said one of the temp’s—which he cited as being “around 22, or 23 years old”—had a “dog out there the size of a Shetland pony. Who’s liable if that thing bites someone?”
 He then concluded by saying, “I was told I had no say over those people. They’re supposed to be there to count the loads, but they’re too lazy to even come out to look at the loads to make sure no one’s dumping the wrong kind of stuff.”
Commissioner Gene West followed up on the matter by walking to the FEMA trailer outside the courthouse housing the Workforce Investment Board personnel during a break in the meeting, where he found current coordinator Ron White.
West recounted Liggett’s complaints to White, specifically another of his colleague’s concerns, namely that the temp’s are “getting paid $12 an hour, which is more than people who regularly work for the County.
“Something needs to be straightened out here,” West continued. “Someone needs to be sat on.”
White acknowledged the temporary workers referenced had been without a supervisor the previous week because “he was gone due to a family emergency.” He also said he was aware of the “dog thing,” commenting “it’s been brought to my attention and I’ll take care of it.”
West continued with his own observations, noting, “We’ve got trash around the courthouse that needs to be picked up and we’ve been trying to get weed eating done around here. Ray (Stegman, emergency preparedness director) told me he’s been trying to get it cleaned up and can’t get it done.”
White responded by saying a “bolt broke in the weed eater” and said he’d been told it was preferred the “County do it” when asking about getting the courthouse grounds mowed. He also told West that he and other two commissioners did, in fact, “have control” over the temporary workers’ performance.
“I’m just voicing concerns brought up this morning, because we sure don’t want to be giving people money for standing around,” West said.
“This is just my third week here and I’m trying to get a handle on the disorganization of this matter,” White replied. “Last week was tough, with the workers’ supervisors gone and two of my three people who check applicants’ qualifications gone too. But I’m getting on top of it now.